4518 and hearsay. You have to attach the records.

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. v Sesey, 2020 NY Slip Op 02822 [App Div 2d 2020]

In opposition, the plaintiff failed to raise a triable issue of fact. The plaintiff submitted, inter alia, an attorney affirmation to which documents were appended purporting to be the note and an allonge. The plaintiff also submitted the affidavit of Nancy Chouanard, a vice president employed by the plaintiff. The attorney affirmation was insufficient to authenticate the documents purporting to be the note and an allonge. The Chouanard affidavit also failed to authenticate such documents. Furthermore, while Chouanard claimed that the plaintiff’s business records showed that the plaintiff received the original note endorsed to it as trustee on November 10, 2005, which would have been prior to the commencement of the Option One foreclosure action, Chouanard failed to identify what documents she relied upon to support that conclusory assertion, much less submit any properly authenticated business records. Even assuming that Chouanard’s affidavit was sufficient to establish a proper foundation for the admission of business records pursuant to CPLR 4518(a), the plaintiff failed to submit copies of the business records themselves. “[T]he business record exception to the hearsay rule applies to a writing or record’ (CPLR 4518[a]) . . . [and] it is the business record itself, not the foundational affidavit, that serves as proof of the matter asserted” (Bank of N.Y. Mellon v Gordon, 171 AD3d 197, 205 [citation omitted]). “While a witness may read into the record from the contents of a document which has been admitted into evidence (see HSBC Bank USA, N.A. v Ozcan, 154 AD3d 822, 826-827), a witness’s description of a document not admitted into evidence is hearsay” (U.S. Bank N.A. v 22 S. Madison, LLC, 170 AD3d 772, 774). Thus, Chouanard’s assertions as to the contents of the records were inadmissible hearsay as the documents themselves were not submitted (see id. at 774; JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. v Grennan, 175 AD3d 1513, 1516). A review of records maintained in the normal course of business does not vest an affiant with personal knowledge (see JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. v Grennan, 175 AD3d at 1517).

Bold is mine.

Similar holdings in HSBC Bank USA, N.A. v Dubose, 175 AD3d 1270 [2d Dept. 2019], Bank of N.Y. Mellon v Gordon, 171 AD3d 197 [2d Dept. 2019], Nationstar Mtge., LLC v Tamargo, 177 AD3d 750 [2d Dept. 2019], Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. v Springer, 2020 NYSlipOp 00176 [2d Dept. 2020], Nationstar Mtge., LLC v Cavallaro, 181 AD3d 688 [2d Dept. 2020], Deutsche Bank Natl. Trust Co. v Dennis, 2020 NYSlipOp 02039 [2d Dept. 2020]

O.K. v Y.M. & Y.W.H.A. of Williamsburg, Inc., 175 AD3d 540 [2d Dept. 2020]

Here, the defendants failed to submit their certificate of incorporation. Contrary to the defendants’ contention, the computer printout they submitted in support of their motion from the website of the New York State Department of State, Division of Corporations was inadmissible, since it was not certified or authenticated, and it was not supported by a factual foundation sufficient to demonstrate its admissibility as a business record (see Werner v City of New York, 135 AD3d 740, 741 [2016]; Dyer v 930 Flushing, LLC, 118 AD3d 742, 742-743 [2014]).

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s