The NYLJ has something special for you.

My week started off with the littlest child breaking my glasses into two.  As you can see, I fixed it with a mix of crazy glue and sewing thread.  Now when I wear them I look like Sloth and it makes my vision all crazy like.  And today, while I was walking home I walked past an electronics store with a Pickachu statute on the outside and I swear, it looked like it was flipping me the bird.  I blame that on my lack of sleep.  What I can't explain is that for second, I was genuinely pissed at Pickachu.1
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And onto the law.  Yesterday's Law Journal had one of those special fancy pants pull out sections: Court of Appeals and Appellate Practice.  One of the sections, indeed, the most important section is, Civil Practice: Substantive Impact of the CPLR.  Sure, there are other sections, but you didn't come here for them.  You can here to see if I would actually fight a statue of a cartoon character and read about the CPLR.

The section covers, among other things CPLR CPLR § 205(a), CPLR § 5511, CPLR § 5304, CPLR § 901(a).

The discussion of CPLR 205(a) revolved around Matter of Goldstein v New York State Urban Dev. Corp.13 NY3d 511 (Ct. App., 2009), a case I posted way back when.  Next is CPLR 5511.  The author, Thomas F. Gleason, starts with Batavia Turf Farms v. County of Genesee, 91 NY 2d 906 (Ct. App. 1998), a remarkably terse decision.  From there he moves to Adams v Genie Indus., Inc., 14 NY3d 535 (Ct. App. 2010), a case I didn't post.  Adams, Mr. Gleason writes, rejected the "more restrictive premise of Batavia, viz., "a stipulation on one issue (such as damages) would foreclose an appeal on other unrelated issues, because a party who had consented to an order could not claim to be aggrieved by any part of it within the meaning of CPLR 5511."2

 In his discussion of class actions, namely CPLR 901(a), he refers to City of New York v Maul, 14 NY3d 499 (Ct. App. 2010), another case I managed to miss.

There's more. But you have to go read it for yourself.

Norman A. Olch, blogger and appellate guru, provides a several book reviews, including Making Your Case, by Scalia and Garner.  Everyone should read it.  You shouldnt need him to tell you to, but, if it that's what it takes, then fine.

Harry Steinberg has a must read section on how not to completely screw up your appeal.  Part of it involves preserving the issues for appeal.  A decision came out today on just that issue: Arrieta v Shams Waterproofing, Inc., 2010 NY Slip Op 06508 (App. Div., 1st 2010). 

I might add some more later.

 

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1.  I'm recycling facebook updates today.

2.  For more cases discussing what it means to be "aggrieved" click HERE.  I think all of them are from the Appellate Division, Second Department.  Mixon v TBV, Inc., 2010 NY Slip Op 05521 (App. Div., 2nd, 2010) is the most recent and probably the most useful.

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